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GuySmall

Through it all, the dedicated and compassionate staff and volunteers at Casey House helped me to be a tower of strength for Sid; otherwise I might have been a house of cards.

Guy Bethell, former vice-chair, Casey House Board of Directors

My relationship with Casey House began in 1997 when my partner Sid needed care. He had lived with HIV for many years, but it wasn’t until 1995 that he developed a number of AIDS-related complications. Forced to give up a successful career in the financial sector, he went on long term disability and became a client of Casey House.

Over the course of the next three years, Sid lost his sight and his kidneys failed. He had to endure many hours of dialysis each week. It was a terrible time for us.

Through it all, the dedicated and compassionate staff and volunteers at Casey House helped me to be a tower of strength for Sid; otherwise I might have been a house of cards.

Finally, after a prolonged battle with HIV/AIDS, late in the night on January 16, 2000, Sid peacefully passed away. I was with him, holding his hand.

The compassionate help we received from Casey House made a world of difference, for Sid, for me, and for our family. Fifteen years later, in my ongoing volunteer work at Casey House I see that same degree of commitment and dedication consistently demonstrated, in many ways.

I’ve watched Casey House nurses and social workers treat clients with tremendous gentleness and patience. I’ve seen receptionists warmly greet worried family members by name. I’ve tasted the delicious, nutritious food that Marcia, the chef, lovingly prepares for our clients, who often arrive at Casey House too depressed to eat.

There is such hope and compassion alive every day at Casey House. Thanks to the kindness of our donors and volunteers, the many people we care for at Casey House – like Sid and me – know that they do not have to cope with the overwhelming challenges of HIV/AIDS alone.