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Two men

Brian Provini has been a generous donor to Casey House ever since we opened our doors in 1988. “Casey House got its start when the North American attitude to AIDS was based on stigma and ignorance,” explains the retired college professor. “June Callwood and the people who started Casey House took an empathetic approach to HIV. Their efforts really helped to turn the tide. And through the years, I’ve watched Casey House continue to expand their programs, as more and more people require treatment.”

I also like that as a donor, I feel part of the Casey House family. I feel appreciated as a person, which is really part of the whole philosophy of Casey House.

Ron Harris

Brian and his partner Ron Harris recently celebrated their 10th anniversary. Together, the couple worked with their lawyer to designate Casey House in their wills. “When I moved to Toronto, Brian brought me to Casey House for a barbecue and I was impressed by June Callwood and the staff, and their work,” says Ron. “I also like that as a donor, I feel part of the Casey House family. I feel appreciated as a person, which is really part of the whole philosophy of Casey House. I’m not just some faceless donor.”

“Neither Ron nor I have family that need our money when we die,” adds Brian. “There’s an old concept, from Greek theology: agape, or the feeling of responsibility to care for people beyond one’s own family. I like knowing that I’m helping people in a time in their lives when they really need support. It’s something I enjoy doing while I’m alive, and so I like knowing that it will carry on after I die.”